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Cabins We Love on “Log Cabin Day”

By Sam Tuttle, Marvin Windows June 29, 2015

Roughly 200 years ago, Americans moved west, leaving the East Coast and venturing into untouched wilderness, settling in forests that reside in present-day states such as Tennessee and Ohio, and eventually moving further west. Life was rustic and simple: wood fires provided heat, and cabins were made from logs.

In 1986, the Log Cabin Society and the Bad Axe Historical Society created “Log Cabin Day” to promote the preservation of log cabins, and to educate people about life during the period in America when log cabins were most common. But whether you’re a history buff or not, cabins remain a love of so many Americans – because really, what better way is there to enjoy summer than by escaping the toils of everyday life and spending some time away at the cabin?

To celebrate Log Cabin Day, we couldn’t help but share some of our favorite cabin getaways. These modern but rustic cabins blend exterior and interior living while taking full advantage of their beautiful surroundings. You’ll find a variety of Marvin products featured in these projects, including the Marvin Ultimate Awning, picture windows, our Ultimate Swinging French Door and the Ultimate Casement.

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Cabin.

Eagle Harbor Cabin
One of our favorite cabins is 2011 Architect Challenge winner, Eagle Harbor Cabin, which is located on a wooded waterfront property on Lake Superior, at the northerly edge of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It features a 40-foot-long glass wall facing the spectacular beauty of the lake – incredible!

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The Lamson
Presenting perhaps a bit more grandeur than your typical log cabin, The Lamson stands tall on a steeply sloped, wooded site, taking a modern twist on a log home in the woods. A window wall not only provides a continual connection to the surrounding woods, but also enables indirect daylight to penetrate the interior. The structure preserves existing drainage patterns, has a grass roof and boasts wood flooring that was locally milled, using walnut trees cleared from the site during construction. It’s definitely a sight to see!

The Lamson

What do you love about getting away to the cabin? Check out more inspiring projects, including some of the ones featured above, in our Inspiration Gallery